Monet, Renoir & the Impressionist Landscape

Claude Monet, (1840–1926), 'Camille Monet and a Child in the Artist's Garden in Argenteuil', 1875, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Anonymous gift in memory of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, 1976

Monet, Renoir and the Impressionist Landscape.

22nd January - 14th April 2002

Millennium Wing

Supported by Eagle Star and Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism

The exhibition, Monet, Renoir and the Impressionist Landscape celebrated the opening of the National Gallery's new Millennium Wing in January 2002. The 69 masterpieces in this show, which were drawn from the Museum of Fine Arts, in Boston, included all the familiar names, Paul Cézanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh.

The paintings traced the roots of Impressionism in the art of Camille Corot and the Barbizon School and extended as far as the Post-Impressionist landscapes of Paul Gauguin and Vincent van Gogh. Of the Impressionists, Claude Monet was shown at the height of his powers, as were Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Camille Pissarro. There were 13 works by Monet, which included paintings from his early period such as Rue de la Bavolle, Honfleur (1864), and Camille Monet and a Child in the artist's garden in Argenteuil, (1875). Other master works by the artist included his Grainstack (Sunset), one of a series of 25 painted between 1890-1891.


Exhibition Guide:
Monet, Renoir and the Impressionist Landscape
© 2002 National Gallery of Ireland and the Authors
Editors Elizabeth Mayes and Fionnuala Croke
Produced with the support of the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
ISBN 0903162970